Claudia, wife of Pontius Pilate
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Claudia, wife of Pontius Pilate a novel by Diana Wallis Taylor

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Published .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Governors" spouses,
  • Bible,
  • Fiction

Book details:

About the Edition

Claudia, the illegitimate granddaughter of Caesar Augustus and wife of Lucius Pontius Pilate, struggles to make the best of her life in troubled Judea and finds peace in the teachings of a mysterious Jewish Rabbi.

Edition Notes

StatementDiana Wallis Taylor
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPS3620.A942 C53 2013
The Physical Object
Pagination326 pages
Number of Pages326
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL27150700M
ISBN 100800721381
ISBN 109780800721381
LC Control Number2013010213
OCLC/WorldCa838197415

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Claudia Title: CLAUDIA Author: Diana Wallis Taylor Publisher: Revell Publish Date: 15 June ASIN: B00B85M Claudia is the story of the wife of Pontius Pilate. I loved the story!/5.   The young woman is adrift--until she meets Lucius Pontius Pilate and becomes his wife. When Pilate is appointed Prefect of the troublesome territory of Judea, Claudia does what she has always done: she makes the best of it. But unrest is brewing on the outskirts of the Roman Empire, and Claudia will soon find herself and her beloved husband embroiled in controversy and rebellion/5(28). Claudia, Wife of Pontius Pilate: Diana Wallis Taylor: - Claudia, Wife of Pontius Pilate. By: Diana Wallis Taylor. Sample Pages. More. Buy Item $ Retail: $ Save 13% ($) 5 out of 5 stars (7 Reviews) In Stock. Quantity/5(7). This book is published in both English and French, translated and revised for French researchers by my colleague, Kris Darquis. It was launched in Rennes-le-Château on April 7th Claudia Procula was a Roman princess and the wife of Pontius Pilate, the man who ordered Jesus Christ to be crucified. Throughout the history of Christendom, Pontius Pilate has been despised.

The book follows the life and tragedies of Claudia, the wife of Pontius Pilate. Claudia travels with her family and then with her husband all across the Roman empire, and I appreciated May’s detailed descriptions of Antioch, Alexandria, Rome, and Jerusalem among other locales/5. Very little, except that she was high-born, Roman, well-educated and wealthy – and the wife of the Roman governor, Pontius Pilate, at the time of Jesus’ death. On the morning of the trial of Jesus, she sent an urgent message to her husband: ‘I had a troubling dream.   Pilate’s wife has been named Procula or Claudia and in the Eastern and Ethiopian Churches she is revered as a saint. The apocryphal but influential Gospel of Nicodemus . Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Claudia, Wife of Pontius Pilate: A Novel by Diana Wallis Taylor (, Trade Paperback) at .

Claudia, Wife of Pontius Pilate: A Novel - Ebook written by Diana Wallis Taylor. Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices. Download for offline reading, /5(10).   If you interested in the redemptive meaning of Rome, the Roman Pontius Pilate, and the Roman cross of execution in the redemption of man by a Jewish Messiah, please see my book The Eternal City: Rome and the Origins of Catholicism. There is a “tradition” that Pontius Pilate’s wife Claudia Procula had a dream of billions of people chanting “sub Pontio Pilato” over and over and over. The Greek church made her a saint and honors her on October 27th. There are no references from the early church fathers which claim her name was “Claudia.” There is a rumor that Pilate’s wife was the woman named Claudia in 2 Timothy The best conclusion from the early church fathers is that Claudia is not the name of Pilate’s wife. Pontius Pilate’s wife is also called Claudia Procula in Christian tradition and is even recognized as a saint in the Greek Orthodox Church and the Ethiopian Orthodox Church. The name “Procula” is derived from the translation of the Gospel of Nicodemus, also called the Acts of Pilate, which scholars think was written in the 4th century. The name Procula is taken from the word “procurator” which was her Pilate’s title in .